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Wildlife

American White Pelican glides with ease

Whew! I’m not sure where the last few days have gone but they were a whirlwind! Between home improvement projects and a raptor photo shoot (pics to come) I haven’t been able to catch a breath.

So, here is one I randomly grabbed from my archives. Taken back in July at Jackson Lake State Park, Colorado. These huge, seasonal visitors to the state make great photo subjects and are my wife’s favorite so when they are around, I am given no choice but to take pictures. 😉

An American White Pelican glides over the waters of a lake on Colorado's plains.  (© Tony’s Takes)

An American White Pelican glides over the waters of a lake on Colorado’s plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

Guardian of the feeder

Going back to August when we were camping in Roosevelt National Forest, Colorado. We had put out our hummingbird feeders and were enjoying watching the little birds come by and grab a drink. This one though seemed to think the feeders belonged to it and it alone. It would perch in the nearby bushes and the second another hummingbird approached it would chase it off. Lots of fun to watch but with as fast as they move, not easy to keep up with.

A Hummingbird keeps close watch on a nearby feeder, ready to chase away any intruders.  (© Tony’s Takes)

A Hummingbird keeps close watch on a nearby feeder, ready to chase away any intruders. (© Tony’s Takes)

Rare Snowy Owl pays a visit to suburbs of Denver

This guy (or gal) has caused quite a stir over the last couple of weeks. It was spotted right before Christmas northeast of Denver in a suburban park and lake area. Of course, once word got out, bird watchers and photographers soon descended. It is very rare for a Snowy Owl to come this far south so it wasn’t surprising to see the interest.

I have spent multiple days out there looking for it but on only one did I have any luck. It had nestled in among some tall grasses so I was never able to get a clear capture of the beautiful creature and the distance was hefty so these images are quite cropped.

At the end of my time with it, it did take off to an area further from the group that had gathered. By then the long shadows signifying the end of day had descended and the light was minimal so my flight shots were not good at all. Even if the pics aren’t the greatest, it was a treat to get to see this.

A Snowy Owl keeps watch from the grasses or a suburban park near Denver, Colorado.  (© Tony’s Takes)

A Snowy Owl keeps watch from the grasses or a suburban park near Denver, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Snowy Owl keeps watch from the grasses or a suburban park near Denver, Colorado.  (© Tony’s Takes)

A Snowy Owl keeps watch from the grasses or a suburban park near Denver, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Snowy Owl keeps watch from the grasses or a suburban park near Denver, Colorado.  (© Tony’s Takes)

A Snowy Owl keeps watch from the grasses or a suburban park near Denver, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Snowy Owl takes flight in a suburban park near Denver, Colorado.  (© Tony’s Takes)

A Snowy Owl takes flight in a suburban park near Denver, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Snowy Owl takes flight in a suburban park near Denver, Colorado.  (© Tony’s Takes)

A Snowy Owl takes flight in a suburban park near Denver, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

“And this is what I think of wildlife photographers.”

“And this is what I think of wildlife photographers.” I recent happened across a Coyote that appeared to have a bit of a sense of humor. It ran across the road not far in front of me and as I came to a stop to take pictures of it, it seemed to want to give me a sense of how it felt about having its photograph taken. Thankfully most of my subjects don’t feel the same. 😉

A Coyote displays a unique way of showing its disdain for having its picture taken. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Coyote displays a unique way of showing its disdain for having its picture taken. (© Tony’s Takes)

Pronghorn in a post-Christmas snow

The temperature on my truck thermometer said it was 8 degrees when I snapped this image the day after Christmas. That certainly did not make me anxious to leave the warm environs but when a friend texted me to tell me about this herd of speed-demons nearby, I had to go.

Thankfully, unlike usual, they weren’t in too big of a rush to race away and gave me time to hop out and snap a few images. They looked absolutely gorgeous against the fresh snow.

A herd of Pronghorn keeps watch while in a field with fresh snow. (© Tony’s Takes)

A herd of Pronghorn keeps watch while in a field with fresh snow. (© Tony’s Takes)

Bald Eagle flies into the New Year

Well yes, of course I am going to start out 2018 with a picture of my favorite creature. 😉 I happened across this gorgeous young eagle not too far from home the day after Christmas. Temperatures were in the single digits and I wasn’t too thrilled about having to walk a good ways to get a good view. Nevertheless, I did and it was kind enough to reward me with some nice poses and this great flyby showcasing its impressive wingspan.

A young Bald Eagle soars with ease in Adams County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A young Bald Eagle soars with ease in Adams County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Video slideshow: Wildlife top shots 2017

We share this planet with some pretty darned amazing creatures and I am blessed to live in a place where wildlife is abundant and easily accessible.

This past year I was able to photograph animals large and small, all impressive in their own right. From North America’s rarest mammal, the small but ferocious Black Footed Ferret, to the massive Grizzly Bear, I’ve captured images of dozens of species, all wondrous in their own right. This video slideshow provides a look back at my favorite images and wildlife encounters from 2017. I can’t wait to see what 2018 brings!

Happy New Year to you all! If you love wildlife as I do, be sure to check out my 2018 calendars and photo book.

Video slideshow: Bald Eagle top shots 2017

As most everyone knows, these majestic creatures are my love and passion. I spend more time photographing Bald Eagles than any other creature and simply cannot get enough of them.

This past year I was fortunate to have captured images of dozens of them, most notably I documented two nest sites that both successfully fledged young. Here are my top shots of these raptors from the past year.

I hope you enjoy these captures of our national emblem as much as I did taking them. If you like these, be sure to check out my 2018 calendars and photo book.

Video slideshow: Top raptor captures of 2017

Nine species of hawks, five types of falcons, three types of owls and two different eagle species were among the birds of prey documented by my camera over the past year. This video slideshow puts together my favorite raptor images from the past year.

From the small but fierce American Kestrel to the massive Golden Eagle, they are all in here. I am truly privileged to have been able to see these magnificent creatures and capture images of them.

I hope you enjoy the show and keep an eye out for more in the coming days as I take a look back at my favorite captures from 2017.  If you like these, be sure to check out my 2018 calendars and photo book.

Great Horned Owl keeping close watch

One of the mated pair of these cool hooters not far from where I live. It had chosen a perch well within some thick tree cover in an attempt to hide from some crows that were hassling its mate. It worked and I was able to get in some quality time photographing it. I just love their eyes!

Great Horned Owls are common across all of North America and are the type of owl often depicted in storybooks. During the day they are usually sleeping but at night they come alive and hunt with amazing accuracy in the dark.

A Great Horned Owl keeps watch from within some thick trees in Adams County, Colorado.  (© Tony’s Takes)

A Great Horned Owl keeps watch from within some thick trees in Adams County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)