Connect With Me
Tony's Takes on Facebook Tony's Takes on Twitter Tony's Takes on Google+ Tony's Takes on Pinterest Tony's Takes RSS Feed
Photo Use Information
All photos © Tony’s Takes. Images are available for purchase as prints or as digital files for other uses. Please don’t steal; my prices aren’t expensive. For more information contact me here.
Archives

Bear

“Mom! Do you really need to watch me do this?”

Absolutely a poor quality picture but one that makes me smile. Taken this past June during our visit to Grand Teton National Park. I was out for an early morning drive while the rest of my crew slept in and I came across this Grizzly Bear sow and her not-so-young cub. The pair was grazing in an open meadow when the young one decided it need to ‘go.’ It was heavily overcast and the sun had just come up so light was minimal and not great for photography but it was fun to see.

A Grizzly Bear sow and her cub in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Grizzly Bear sow and her cub in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. (© Tony’s Takes)

Black Bear enjoying a morning snack

One of the bears we saw during our early summer trip to Yellowstone National Park. This one was grazing not 20 yards off the road, largely ignoring us and a couple other folks that had come along and were watching us.

Ursus americanus is by far the most common bear in North America with a wide range and populations in most wooded and higher elevation areas of the continent. While not as big as some of their cousins, they can be 5 to 6 feet in length and weigh from 200 to 600 pounds. This particular one was probably right about in the middle of those ranges.

An American Black Bear grazes in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.  (© Tony’s Takes)

An American Black Bear grazes in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. (© Tony’s Takes)

Young Grizzly Bear answers an age old question

We have all heard the phrase, “Does a bear – well, you know – in the woods?” This image taken a few weeks ago when we were in Grand Teton National Park would seem to answer it. 😉

I tried hard to find Grizzly Bears while on my trip but this was the only encounter I had. Out early one morning, I spot this young bear and its mother as they wandered through a small meadow.

It was very early and heavily overcast so the light was horrible. As a result, the pictures are not the best but just getting to see these intimidating creatures is a treat.

A young Grizzly Bear and its mother in Grand Teton National Park.  (© Tony’s Takes)

A young Grizzly Bear and its mother in Grand Teton National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

Big mama Grizzly Bear out for a morning walk

I tried hard to find Grizzly Bears while on my trip to Yellowstone and the Tetons but this was the only encounter I had.

Out early one morning, I spot a sow and her two year old offspring as they wandered through a small meadow. Unfortunately, not long after I arrived, so too did some rather noisy tourists and the bears opted to head off immediately.

It was very early and heavily overcast so the light was horrible and as a result, the pictures are not the best. Nevertheless, seeing one of these massive creatures is always a thrill and something I cherish.

Taken in the Pacific Creek area of Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming.

A Grizzly Bear sow emerges from the bushes in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Grizzly Bear sow emerges from the bushes in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. (© Tony’s Takes)

Black Bear on a stroll through the spring grass

I have been quite fortunate on my few visits to Yellowstone National Park in having seen multiple Black Bears on each trip. Oftentimes the view is fleeting though and pictures less than stellar. Last Sunday however the stars aligned and I was able to get some great pictures of this Ursus Americanus.

While the morning had yielded many worthwhile photo subjects, none were a bear and I was getting discouraged and frustrated. As we worked our way toward the Tower-Roosevelt area, I was however hopeful as in the past we had good luck there. Sure enough, we round a corner to see a hulking, black form among the tall grass not far from the road.

Having a feel for the direction it was heading and wanting to give it a wide berth and not disturb it, we went past it a good way and pulled over. I didn’t have a good view of the bear initially but I knew the angle I wanted and was hoping it would continue on the path I anticipated. I crouched down, pointed my camera and then waited.

Sure enough, here it came, emerging from the tall grass, walking along and occasionally grabbing a mouthful of foliage for a morning snack. I got a number of good captures of it but this is by far my favorite. I love the low, head-on perspective and the eyes of the bear really look great.

Image available for purchase here.

An American Black Bear walks through the grass in the Tower-Roosevelt area of Yellowstone National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

An American Black Bear walks through the grass in the Tower-Roosevelt area of Yellowstone National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

 

Black Bear casts a wary eye

This beautiful bear was quite comfortable with my son and I as we photographed it grazing in Jasper National Park in Alberta, Canada back in June. That isn’t to say though that it wasn’t wary and cautious of us despite us keeping a very healthy distance from it. In fact it was abundantly clear that while it was tolerating our presence, it was also keeping close watch on us.

Here, it was moving from one grazing location to another and cast a deliberate glance right at us as if to say, “Yes, I know you are there.”

Common across many parts of North America, Black Bears can be up to 6 feet long and weigh up to 600 pounds. While they typically eat grasses, roots and berries, they have adapted to human presence and are known for taking advantage of trash and other sources left behind by humans.

A Black Bear keeps close watch as it crosses the road in Jasper National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Black Bear keeps close watch as it crosses the road in Jasper National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

Cinnamon-faced Black Bear stays focused

Seeing one bear makes for a great day of wildlife viewing. Seeing three in a span of five miles and one hour makes for an awesome day. Such was the case on this day in June in the northern Rocky Mountains of Jasper National Park.

After spending a half hour watching one bear, we moved on and came across this one a couple of miles away. It was a bit unusual looking with its cinnamon colored face but quite handsome. This image, captured as it was taking a step forward, also showcases its impressive claws.

The bear largely ignored us and a few other people that were nearby but did keep focused on the humans as you can see by the look in its eyes.

A Black Bear takes a step forward in Jasper National Park, Canada. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Black Bear takes a step forward in Jasper National Park, Canada. (© Tony’s Takes)

The lumbering king of the forest

To say a Grizzly Bear is intimidating is probably a bit of an understatement. Adult males can weigh between 600 and 900 pounds and can be as tall as 4 feet at the shoulder. They are massive creatures and at the top of the food chain without question.

Naturalist George Ord gave the bear its classification, ursus arctos horribilis, due to its intimidating character. Lewis and Clark studied and wrote extensively about grizzlies including relaying one story in their journals of an encounter during which Lewis was actually chased by one. Not an enviable position to be in for sure!

This particular bear was one I saw in Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada last month.

A Grizzly Bear proudly walks through a meadow in Banff National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Grizzly Bear proudly walks through a meadow in Banff National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

American Black Bear grazes in the Canadian Rockies

It was our second full day in Jasper National Park and despite hours spent looking, I had yet to see a bear and was growing frustrated. The fact our sightseeing trip for the day was coming to an end heightened my anxiety but then things changed – big time.

We came across this gorgeous bear grazing in the Medicine Lake area and it obliged us with all the pictures we wanted. After leaving it to continue eating in peace we came across another about a mile away and then two miles later, another! Patience is a virtue and sometimes when looking for wildlife, I would do well to remember that. 😉

Ursus americanus is by far the most common bear in North America with a wide range and populations in most wooded and higher elevation areas of the continent. While not as big as some of their cousins, they can be 5 to 6 feet in length and weigh from 200 to 600 pounds. This one was not particularly large, probably in the low to medium parts of those ranges.

A Black Bear grazes in Jasper National Park, Canada. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Black Bear grazes in Jasper National Park, Canada. (© Tony’s Takes)

Black Bear makes time for a bit of play

So much fun to happen across a pair of Black Bears on this particular morning (June 24) in Jasper National Park. They were walking through some pretty thick brush together when, in a relatively open spot, the one in the lead laid down and rolled on its back looking right at the other. I love being able to see its footprint!

I don’t know enough about bears to speak with any authority, but I do suspect it was a bit of foreplay because as they disappeared into the forest, one was clearly trying to jump on the other as it walked. 😉

Our trip to the Canadian Rockies allowed us to see quite a few of these cool creatures – a total of 10 across the three parks of Jasper, Banff and Glacier. By far though, the best opportunities and pictures came from Jasper.

A Black Bear lays on its back in the grass in Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Black Bear lays on its back in the grass in Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada. (© Tony’s Takes)