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Mountain Goat

The lopsided Mountain Goat

I can’t say I had ever seen a Mountain Goat without symmetrical horns until I found this one. While near the top of Logan Pass in Glacier National Park, we spotted this one down below the road a good ways.

Light was fleeting as it was late evening and the sun was behind the mountains but the image didn’t come out too bad. Clearly the creature did not care for me taking its picture judging by the tongue it was sticking out at me. 😉

A Mountain Goat in Glacier National Park sticks its tongue out at the photographer. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Mountain Goat in Glacier National Park sticks its tongue out at the photographer. (© Tony’s Takes)

A very cute kid

If this little one doesn’t just melt your heart then you are a much harder person than I. 😉

My own kids wanted a break from all the sightseeing so my wife and I headed out for an evening wildlife viewing on our own on this evening (June 30). From St. Mary, Montana we headed west up to the top of Logan Pass in Glacier National Park.

Just over the summit we came across a beautiful Mountain Goat nanny and its kid. Ignoring the photographers, the pair walked along, grazing and enjoying a quiet evening in the alpine forest.

The kid never strayed far from mom but couldn’t help but be a bit distracted by all the attention it was receiving, stopping every now and then to look at the people. This little one was only a little over a month or so old and it will continue to hang around with its mother for the next year or so.

Mountain Goats have a native range stretching from southern Alaska to the Rocky Mountains. The populations here in Colorado where I live are actually non-native, having been brought here in the middle of the 20th century as a tourist attraction.

A Mountain Goat kid grazes on grass near the summit of Logan Pass in Glacier National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Mountain Goat kid grazes on grass near the summit of Logan Pass in Glacier National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

Just chillin’ out

In the evening at Glacier National Park it was almost a certainty that we would find at least one of these cool creatures hanging out on Logan Pass. On this, what was our first day in our park, this one was content to lay on the snow and stay cool.

A Mountain Goat hangs out on the snow at the top of Logan Pass in Glacier National Park, Montana. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Mountain Goat hangs out on the snow at the top of Logan Pass in Glacier National Park, Montana. (© Tony’s Takes)

Mountain Goat kid stands tall

Taken back in August, this little gal was hanging out with her herd near the top of Mount Evans just as the sun was coming over the horizon. My friend and I had to hike a good ways at 13,000 feet to get a good view of them and while it was cold and the air extremely thin, it was well worth it.

Mountain Goats are actually considered an invasive species here in Colorado as they are not native to the Centennial State having been brought here in the early 20th century as a tourist attraction. Unfortunately Mountain Goats can carry diseases which are deadly to our state’s official animal, the Big Horn Sheep. When the goats roam into sheep territory, they are often killed to prevent them from infecting the sheep.

A Mountain Goat kid stands tall and proud on Mount Evans in Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Mountain Goat kid stands tall and proud on Mount Evans in Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Mountain Goat in black and white

A bit of a different look that I kind of like. This was taken back in August near the top of Mount Evans, Colorado. The goats weren’t particularly cooperative on this day and wanted to keep their distance but I managed a few nice captures.

Mountain Goats are actually considered an invasive species here in Colorado as they are not native to the Centennial State having been brought here in the early 20th century as a tourist attraction and game animal. Unfortunately Mountain Goats can carry diseases which are deadly to our state’s official animal, the Big Horn Sheep. When the goats roam into sheep territory, they are often killed to prevent them from infecting the sheep.

A Mountain Goat at the top of Mount Evans, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Mountain Goat at the top of Mount Evans, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Move along kids

This image was taken back in August when the flowers were still blooming and the colors were just starting to hint at changing. Unfortunately I won’t be back up to visit these cool creatures until next spring at the earliest. The road up the to the top of the 14,265 foot high peak closes tomorrow for the season as wintry weather will soon make it impassable. ?

An adult Mountain Goat ushers along two kids at the top of Mount Evans, Colorado.  (© Tony’s Takes)

An adult Mountain Goat ushers along two kids at the top of Mount Evans, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Following in dad’s footsteps

This Mountain Goat kid was sticking close to a male as they worked their way up Mount Evans on Sunday.  When the herd came to a stop the kid would show some independence but when on the move, it seemed to want to stick close to the adult.

Did you know Mountain Goats aren’t native to Colorado?  They are actually native to the Pacific Northwest and northern Rocky Mountains.  The animals were brought to the Centennial State in the 1940s and 50s as game animals and as tourist attractions.

A Mountain Goat kid follows an adult as they ascend Mount Evans in Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Mountain Goat kid follows an adult as they ascend Mount Evans in Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Back off, junior!

One of the senior members of Mount Evans’ Mountain Goat herd lets a juvenile know he / she was getting a bit too rambunctious. The young one was quite active and playful, bounding around, butting the others. This particular adult was in no mood to play though and knocked junior down a peg or two.

As long as Mother Nature cooperates, I am definitely going to try to get back up there for another visit with this cool creatures.

A senior member of a Mountain Goat herd teaches a younger one a lesson. (© Tony’s Takes)

A senior member of a Mountain Goat herd teaches a younger one a lesson. (© Tony’s Takes)

You really want to take a picture of me doing this???

Mountain Goat near the top of Mount Evans, Colorado this morning is seen ‘taking care of business.’ My first time back there since about this same time last year. Last year they were very accessible and only 30 feet away. This year they were in a shallow alpine valley that required a pretty good hike and they were a bit skittish so I kept my distance. Going down was easy; up not so much. There sure isn’t much air at 13,000+ feet!

A Mountain Goat on Mount Evans, Colorado takes care of business. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Mountain Goat on Mount Evans, Colorado takes care of business. (© Tony’s Takes)

Mountain Goat adult and kid sample the rocks

I am smiling this evening because word came out today that the Colorado Department of Transportation? has opened the road to the top of Mount Evans. Awesome! That means in the coming weeks I should be able to make the journey to the 14,265 foot mountain and spend some time with these cool creatures again. This image taken on August 17, 2014.

An adult Mountain Goat and kid lick the rocks on top of Mount Evans, Colorado.  (© Tony’s Takes)

An adult Mountain Goat and kid lick the rocks on top of Mount Evans, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)