Connect With Me
Tony's Takes on Facebook Tony's Takes on Google+ Tony's Takes on Twitter Tony's Takes on Pinterest Tony's Takes RSS Feed
Photo Use Information
All photos © Tony’s Takes. Images are available for purchase as prints or as digital files for other uses. Please don’t steal; my prices aren’t expensive. For more information contact me here.
Archives

Pronghorn

Pronghorn does and fawns focus on me

Taken back in July, this was the first time I had gotten a decent picture of baby Pronghorn. There were actually three with their moms but the third set was out of the frame. As is typical for these creatures, they didn’t hang around long once they saw me but did check me out for a brief moment.

Sometimes mistakenly called antelope, their closest relatives are actually giraffes and okapi. It is believed Pronghorn developed their extraordinary speed when the now extinct American Cheetah was a threat.

Pronghorn does and fawns keep close watch on the photographer on the Colorado plains.  (© Tony’s Takes)

Pronghorn does and fawns keep close watch on the photographer on the Colorado plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

Off to the races!

These speed demons rarely stand still and pose for pictures and such was the case of this bachelor herd of Pronghorn. The second I brought my truck to a stop, the race was on!

They took off across a field to escape my view but, thankfully, they opted to stay parallel to the road briefly. I managed a few, quick pictures while going at 40mph (my son was driving). It was pretty exciting and really made me appreciate just how fast they can run.

Pronghorn (often incorrectly called antelope) are the fastest land animal in the Western Hemisphere and second in the world only to the Cheetah. They can sprint at speeds up to 60mph and run for extraordinarily long distances at slower speeds.

A bachelor herd of Pronghorn races across a freshly cut wheat field on the plains of Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A bachelor herd of Pronghorn races across a freshly cut wheat field on the plains of Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Pronghorn buck pauses to have its picture taken

My, what a handsome fellow this guy was. He was out walking through a recently harvested wheat field and was kind enough to give me a few captures. Those horns of his are some of the biggest I have seen on one.

Pronghorn (often incorrectly called antelope) are the fastest land animal in the Western Hemisphere and second in the world only to the Cheetah. They can sprint at speeds up to 60mph and run for extraordinarily long distances at slower speeds.

Before the arrival of western Europeans, it is believed as many as 40 million of them roamed the open rangelands of North America – possibly more than there were bison. Hunting and fragmentation of their habitat by fences and human settlements took its toll and as few as 20,000 remained at the start of the 20th century. Thankfully conservation and education saved them from extinction and they now number almost 1 million.

A Pronghorn Buck walks across a recently harvested wheat field in Colorado.  (© Tony’s Takes)

A Pronghorn Buck walks across a recently harvested wheat field in Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Posing Pronghorn buck

Our second day in Yellowstone National Park last week saw us head to the Lamar Valley, our favorite area of the park for seeing wildlife. As always, it did not disappoint.

Among the creatures we were able to view and photograph was this handsome Pronghorn buck. He was initially lounging around, watching the tourists go by then got up and struck a nice pose for me.

Sometimes mistakenly called antelope, their closest relatives are actually giraffes and okapi. It is believed Pronghorn developed their extraordinary speed when the now extinct American Cheetah was a threat.

They are in fact the fastest land animal in the Western Hemisphere and second in the world only to the Cheetah. They can sprint at speeds up to 60mph and run for extraordinarily long distances at slower speeds. That speed and endurance continues to come in handy for escaping the threats of today – coyotes, wolves and of course man.

A Pronghorn buck poses in Yellowstone's Lamar Valley. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Pronghorn buck poses in Yellowstone’s Lamar Valley. (© Tony’s Takes)

A lot of eyes on the photographer – at least 24 of them in fact

A very pleasant surprise running into this herd of Pronghorn as I hadn’t seen them in a few months. They were a good ways out in a field and immediately alerted to my presence – as always.

I decided to be sneaky and moved to a place where there was a small rise between them and I. I then slowly approached, crouched over as far as I could, keeping my head down. I only raised up when I was sure I would have a chance to get some captures. They of course immediately knew I was there and their eyes – almost all of them – trained right on me.

After a few minutes of staring, they took off running but not until I managed some decent captures, including this one with them clearly focused on me and the gorgeous Rocky #Mountains in the background. Taken in Adams County, Colorado.

Scroll down to see more images from my time with these fast movers.

A herd of Pronghorn is clearly aware that their picture is being taken on the Great Plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

A herd of Pronghorn is clearly aware that their picture is being taken on the Great Plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

Pronghorn buck stands proud on the plains

This handsome fellow was patrolling the Colorado plains this past weekend. Clearly an older buck judging by the size of his horns, he was willing to pose for a few pictures – but no more – before putting some distance between himself and I.

I actually ended up getting into a bit of a race with him as he showcased his incredible speed. After he walked off and got out of range, I continued on, turning on a perpendicular road looking for other wildlife. Next thing I know, he is on a hillside about 50 yards away running at full speed parallel to my truck – at just over 40 mph!

He raced alongside for a good half mile or so before peeling off to the other side of the hill. It was almost as if he was wanting to test his speed against me. 😉 I so wish I had been able to capture video and drive at the same time as it was absolutely impressive how fast and easily this speed demon was able to move across the grasslands. It was an amazing thing to see! Taken in Morgan County, Colorado.

A Pronghorn buck stands proudly on the plains of Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Pronghorn buck stands proudly on the plains of Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A very pregnant Pronghorn

With the rest of my camping crew insisting on sleeping in, I went for a quick photo excursion from the campsite Saturday.

Three Pronghorn does were grazing in a field, two of which were clearly pregnant – one looked like she was going to give birth any minute now. I almost wanted to hang around until the little one made its appearance! The one that wasn’t pregnant was quite curious about me and in fact walked closer to get a better look at the goofy guy with the camera. 😉

Needless to say, I will be checking this spot this coming weekend in hopes that I get to see my first baby Pronghorn.

Taken in Morgan County, Colorado.

A pregnant Pronghorn doe keeps watch on the plains of Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A pregnant Pronghorn doe keeps watch on the plains of Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A pregnant Pronghorn doe and another, younger doe. (© Tony’s Takes)

A pregnant Pronghorn doe and another, younger doe. (© Tony’s Takes)

A very curious Pronghorn doe keeps watch on the plains of Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A very curious Pronghorn doe keeps watch on the plains of Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Pretty pair of Pronghorn

These beautiful ladies along with a few others in the harem were hanging out with their man on the wide open prairie of Larimer County, Colorado last week. As always, the speedsters did not stand still for long and soon took off for a spot out of sight.

Sometimes mistakenly called antelope, their closest relatives are actually giraffes and okapi. It is believed Pronghorn developed their extraordinary speed when the now extinct American Cheetah was a threat. That speed and endurance continues to come in handy for escaping the threats of today – coyotes, wolves and of course man.

A pair of Pronghorn does keep close watch in Larimer County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A pair of Pronghorn does keep close watch in Larimer County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Pair of Pronghorn bucks get ready to run

If you’ve ever tried to get pictures of these speed demons you know how frustrating it can be. Pronghorn are notoriously skittish and quick to run in the opposite direction when they see you coming. More often than not, that results in a shot of them from the rear.

Last week at the Pawnee National Grasslands in Colorado the Pronghorn were numerous although oftentimes too far in the distance to get a decent capture. A few times though I at least had some opportunities, including this one. There were actually three bucks hanging out together and while they initially ran, they did pause briefly giving me just enough time to grab a couple of shots of them. After that, they were off to the races again.

A pair of Pronghorn bucks take a break from running to look at the photographer. (© Tony’s Takes)

A pair of Pronghorn bucks take a break from running to look at the photographer. (© Tony’s Takes)

A very curious, very pretty Pronghorn

While her elders behind her ignored the guy with the big camera, this gorgeous young one was most interested in what I was doing.

I find these animals thoroughly fascinating. They seem like something that would be more likely to be found in the African Serengeti than the Great Plains of North America.

Pronghorn are the fastest land animal in the Western Hemisphere and second in the world only to the Cheetah. They can sprint at speeds up to 60mph and run for extraordinarily long distances at slower speeds.

Taken in Larimer County, Colorado.

A very pretty Pronghorn looks toward the camera in Larimer County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A very pretty Pronghorn looks toward the camera in Larimer County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)