Connect With Me
Tony's Takes on Facebook Tony's Takes on Twitter Tony's Takes on Google+ Tony's Takes on Pinterest Tony's Takes RSS Feed
Photo Use Information
All photos © Tony’s Takes. Images are available for purchase as prints or as digital files for other uses. Please don’t steal; my prices aren’t expensive. For more information contact me here.
Archives

Pronghorn

A very curious, very pretty Pronghorn

While her elders behind her ignored the guy with the big camera, this gorgeous young one was most interested in what I was doing.

I find these animals thoroughly fascinating. They seem like something that would be more likely to be found in the African Serengeti than the Great Plains of North America.

Pronghorn are the fastest land animal in the Western Hemisphere and second in the world only to the Cheetah. They can sprint at speeds up to 60mph and run for extraordinarily long distances at slower speeds.

Taken in Larimer County, Colorado.

A very pretty Pronghorn looks toward the camera in Larimer County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A very pretty Pronghorn looks toward the camera in Larimer County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Do Pronghorn pee on the plains?

Apparently the answer to that age old question is yes. 😉 Sorry, I couldn’t resist.

This gal probably didn’t appreciate me snapping pics of her as she did her business but she was out in the open so what choice did I have? Taken in Larimer County, Colorado.

Pronghorn? are what folks oftentimes call antelope (and sing about ala “Home on the Range”) however that is a misnomer. Settlers called these animals antelope due to their similarity to Old World species however the pronghorn is its own, distinct family.

A Pronghorn doe relieves herself on the Colorado plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Pronghorn doe relieves herself on the Colorado plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

Pretty Pronghorn flirts, poses for pictures

Okay, I am flattering myself. She really just had an itch. 😉

I had to go to Cheyenne, Wyoming for work today and on the way back I came across a herd of 17 of these cool creatures in Larimer County, Colorado. They kept their distance so my pictures didn’t come out as good as I would have liked but at least they didn’t turn tail and run like they usually do.

Pronghorn are the fastest land animal in the Western Hemisphere and second in the world only to the Cheetah. They can sprint at speeds up to 60mph and run for extraordinarily long distances at slower speeds.

A very pretty Pronghorn doe scratches herself in Larimer County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A very pretty Pronghorn doe scratches herself in Larimer County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Pronghorn on the snow-covered plains

As many photographers will attest to, the normal view you get of these creatures is their derriere as they run away from you. They are notoriously skittish and not likely to hang around when humans are present.

Yesterday though I had a fantastic opportunity coming across a herd of 40 or so of them in northern Colorado. They were certainly wary and they did back off and keep their distance but thankfully not so far that I couldn’t get some nice captures of them in the snowy fields.

They are the fastest land animal in the Western Hemisphere and second in the world only to the Cheetah. Pronghorn can sprint at speeds up to 60mph and run for extraordinarily long distances at slower speeds.

Before the arrival of western Europeans, it is believed as many as 40 million of them roamed the open rangelands of North America – possibly more than there were bison. Hunting and fragmentation of their habitat by fences and human settlements took its toll and as few as 20,000 remained at the start of the 20th century. Thankfully conservation and education saved them from extinction and they now number almost 1 million.

Taken in Larimer County, Colorado.

A beautiful female Pronghorn keeps watch on the Colorado plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

A beautiful female Pronghorn keep watch on the Colorado plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

Two male Pronghorn keeps watch on the Colorado plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

Two male Pronghorn keep watch on the Colorado plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

A male and female Pronghorn gallop across the Colorado plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

A male and female Pronghorn gallop across the Colorado plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

A beautiful young Pronghorn keeps watch on the Colorado plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

A beautiful young Pronghorn keep watch on the Colorado plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

A beautiful young Pronghorn trots across the Colorado plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

A beautiful young Pronghorn trots across the Colorado plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

Where the deer and the antelope play

An absolutely gorgeous panoramic today in northern Colorado. I had to go to Cheyenne for work and on my way back this morning I came across a herd of about 40 of these beautiful animals. Throw in the snow covered plains and mountains and it made for a nice pic. Best of all, the herd was relatively tolerant of me and let me get some great images. You’ll be seeing more of them in the near future.

BTW, these are not truly antelope. Pronghorn are what folks oftentimes call antelope (and sing about ala “Home on the Range”) however that is a misnomer. Settlers called these animals antelope due to their similarity to Old World species however the pronghorn is its own, distinct family.

A herd of Pronghorn graze in the plains with the snow-capped Rocky Mountains in the background. (© Tony’s Takes)

A herd of Pronghorn graze in the plains with the snow-capped Rocky Mountains in the background. (© Tony’s Takes)

Proud Pronghorn buck keeps close watch on the Colorado plains

While heading to the Pawnee National Grasslands last week I was absolutely ecstatic to have come across this handsome fellow.

Getting pictures of these fast movers (the second fastest land animal on Earth) has been a challenge for me.  They are notoriously skittish and more often than not, by the time I have my camera clicking, I am getting pictures of only their rear end.  😉   This particular one though posed just long enough for me to grab this image.

Pronghorn are what folks oftentimes call antelope (and sing about ala “Home on the Range”) however that is a misnomer.  Settlers called these animals antelope due to their similarity to Old World species however the pronghorn is its own, distinct family.

A male Pronghorn stands proudly on the Pawnee National Grasslands, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A male Pronghorn stands proudly on the Pawnee National Grasslands, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Pronghorn pair on the prairie

There is a small herd of these cool animals that hangs out near #Denver International Airport but they have proven to be very elusive. When I do see them either they are too far away or take off running when they see me coming (maybe trying to send me a message – haha).

Saturday I was lucky enough to find them relatively close and was able to grab a couple of pictures before they took off. Being the second fastest land animal on the planet, they took off quick too! 😉

A pair of pronghorn keep watch on the Colorado plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

A pair of pronghorn keep watch on the Colorado plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

Herd of Pronghorn near Denver area suburbs

A very pleasant surprise finding a herd of about 12 pronghorn yesterday just on the outskirts of north suburban Denver. I’ve seen them north close to and in Wyoming and further out on the eastern plains but never this close to the city.

Their predominantly light color stood out like a sore thumb on the green field allowing me to spot them from quite a ways away. I raced to get as close as I could, pulled over and scrambled up a small hill to get a view.

Unfortunately they were moving away and I never got all that close to them. Nevertheless, it was a lot of fun to see them.

Pronghorn are what folks oftentimes mistakenly call antelope (and sing about ala “Home on the Range”). However there are no species of antelope in North America. These speed demons are capable of speeds up to 55mph! They are the fastest land animal in the Western Hemisphere and the second fastest land animal on earth – only the cheetah is faster.

Scroll down for more images.

Pronghorn walk across an open field north of Denver, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Pronghorn walk across an open field north of Denver, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Where to next?

A pronghorn buck looks into the valley below as if contemplating where it should bound off to next.

Pronghorn are what folks oftentimes mistakenly call antelope. However there are no species of antelope in North America. These speed demons are the second fastest land animal on earth – only the #cheetah is faster – and capable of speeds to 55mph.

Image taken this past July in Grand Teton National Park.

A pronghorn looks over the hill in Grand Teton National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

A pronghorn looks over the hill in Grand Teton National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)