Connect With Me
Tony's Takes on Facebook Tony's Takes on Twitter Tony's Takes on Google+ Tony's Takes on Pinterest Tony's Takes RSS Feed
Photo Use Information
All photos © Tony’s Takes. Images are available for purchase as prints or as digital files for other uses. Please don’t steal; my prices aren’t expensive. For more information contact me here.
Archives

Rabbit

Jackrabbit keeps its most notable feature down low

The ears on these residents of the Great Plains are so large they are usually the first thing you see when you spot them. This particular Black-tailed Jackrabbit had the right idea to try to conceal itself by tucking them down low. I had already spotted it though as it sat on the brush covered landscape on northeastern Colorado. It didn’t stay around long but did give me this capture.

Also called the American desert hare, these jackrabbits have a wide range across the western United States where they can be found at altitudes ranging from sea level to 10,000 feet. Here in Colorado, they are pretty common on the plains.

A Black-tailed Jackrabbit tries to hide on the Colorado plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Black-tailed Jackrabbit tries to hide on the Colorado plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

Jack the Rabbit hunkers down to hide

A surprisingly cold, wintry morning yesterday on the Colorado plains. I was of course not deterred and ventured out looking for photo subjects. While scanning a field, I see this somewhat large object racing across the field in the distance. As it neared, I realized it was a jackrabbit.

By the time I got turned around, I had lost sight of it so began looking close at where I last saw it. Finally, I see this little brown spot among the snow-covered field. With his ears tucked back, I could barely make him out. Judging by how big his eyes were, he wasn’t too thrilled to have been spotted. 😉

A White-tailed Jackrabbit hunkers down in its hold among a snowy field. (© Tony’s Takes)

A White-tailed Jackrabbit hunkers down in its hold among a snowy field. (© Tony’s Takes)

Black-tailed Jackrabbit keeps a close watch on its behind

These big-eared denizens of the Great Plains don’t usually want to pose for pictures. Occasionally you come across one that will pose and such was the case on this morning in July.

I kind of find these guys a bit disturbing. They are really quite big and not near as cute as you typically envision a rabbit to be. 😉

Also called the American desert hare, these jackrabbits have a wide range across the western United States where they can be found at altitudes ranging from sea level to 10,000 feet. Here in Colorado, they are pretty common on the plains.

A Black-tailed Jackrabbit keeps close watch from among the grasses of the Great Plains.   (© Tony’s Takes)

A Black-tailed Jackrabbit keeps close watch from among the grasses of the Great Plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

Jack never understood why everyone could find him so easily when playing hide and seek

Jack never understood why everyone could find him so easily when playing hide and seek. 😉

This Black-tailed Jackrabbit did its best to hide from me yesterday morning but those ears were a dead giveaway as to its location.

Also called the American desert hare, these jackrabbits have a wide range across the western United States where they can be found at altitudes ranging from sea level to 10,000 feet. Here in Colorado, they are pretty common on the plains.?

A Black-tailed Jackrabbit tries to hide but its ears give it away. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Black-tailed Jackrabbit tries to hide but its ears give it away. (© Tony’s Takes)

Little rabbit hunkers down against the cold

Late season snowstorms can be a bit of a shocker to not only those humans that forget we live in Colorado, but also to the wildlife. The rabbits were out in abundance yesterday for some reason. This little one opted to stay huddled down in a burrow opening, perhaps waiting for the sun to warm things up a bit.

A rabbit huddles in a burrow after a late season snowstorm. (© Tony’s Takes)

A rabbit huddles in a burrow after a late season snowstorm. (© Tony’s Takes)

Red-tailed Hawk tries to make a meal out of a Jackrabbit

A fun series of images that I captured last Friday while out for a drive near Denver International Airport.

I was driving along and see a flurry of activity in a field and on closer inspection, I see a hawk and rabbit on the ground. The hawk took flight and circled back around, taking a dive at the rabbit. I flipped a quick u-turn and trained my camera on the action. Three times more the hawk dove at the rabbit.

This series captures the final attack pass. Surprisingly the rabbit never ran off, instead choosing to sit there and then jump and evade whenever the hawk got close. It must have worked though as the raptor soon gave up and flew off in search of an easier meal. In this case, the prey got the better of the predator.

Scroll down to view all the images in the sequence.

A Red-tailed Hawk dives toward a Jackrabbit.  (© Tony’s Takes)

A Red-tailed Hawk dives toward a Jackrabbit. (© Tony’s Takes)

White-tailed Jackrabbit plays hide and seek

Thanks to his big ears, Jack was never very good at hide and seek. 😉

I spotted quite a few White-tailed Jackrabbits recently on the Colorado plains but as usual, they took off running before I could even come to a stop. This guy thought he would be clever and hunkered down among some sagebrush not too far off the road. A rising sun behind him lit up those big old ears like a beacon though, effectively negating any camouflage he had.

Although this picture doesn’t convey it, these rabbits are very large. I kind of find them a bit disturbing, like something out of a horror flick.

A White-tailed Jackrabbit hides in the sagebrush on Colorado's plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

A White-tailed Jackrabbit hides in the sagebrush on Colorado’s plains. (© Tony’s Takes)

Do NOT interrupt this eagle’s breakfast

Boy, if looks could kill I think I would be as dead as the rabbit this Bald Eagle caught. 😉 In truth, it wasn’t too bothered by my presence and enjoyed most of its meal right in front of me before heading off elsewhere to finish in private.

A Bald Eagle looks quite serious as it devours a rabbit. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Bald Eagle looks quite serious as it devours a rabbit. (© Tony’s Takes)

Juvenile Bald Eagle climbs through fence for breakfast

An amazing – and lucky – encounter with this young Bald Eagle yesterday. I was actually observing a different juvy on a pole that was a good ways off hoping it would take off and give me a good view.

While sitting there, this young one flew in. It landed on the opposite side of a barbed wire fence and much to my surprise, proceeded to climb through the fence to reach a dead rabbit. I am guessing it had killed it earlier.  After enjoying its meal, it flew to a nearby pole.

Not the best quality of pics as I was shooting right into the sun but a fun and unusual sequence.  Scroll down to view the entire gallery.

A juvenile Bald Eagle crosses a barbed wire fence to reach its kill - a rabbit.  (© Tony’s Takes)

A juvenile Bald Eagle crosses a barbed wire fence to reach its kill – a rabbit. (© Tony’s Takes)