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“Would you please just leave me alone?”

Spotting a Great Horned Owl is not normally easy but sometimes you get the help of other feathered creatures. Such was the case here. I headed out at sunrise to try to see if I could find Houdini and Henrietta, a nesting pair of Great Horned Owls not far from my home.

I did find them surprisingly easily initially but both flew off, preferring their privacy. I wasn’t having much fun relocating them but then heard a racket of cackling crows. I knew that likely meant they had found one of my owl friends and were not happy about.

Following the sound, I found Henrietta and, unfortunately for her, about a half-dozen crows that were hassling her. She was pretty upset, no doubt just wanting to sleep after a night out and about. She would move to another roost and the crows would follow, never giving her a moment of peace. This went on for a good half hour before the black birds gave up and my female owl friend got a break.

A Great Horned Owl is hassled by crows in Adams County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Great Horned Owl is hassled by crows in Adams County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Great Horned Owl is hassled by crows in Adams County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Great Horned Owl is hassled by crows in Adams County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Great Horned Owl is hassled by crows in Adams County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Great Horned Owl is hassled by crows in Adams County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

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