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Mountain Goat

Mountain Goat glows in the light of sunrise at high altitude

Standing proud near the top of the 14,265-foot-high Mount Evans, this handsome fellow looked absolutely gorgeous as the sun began its climb above the horizon. On for #TBT, this image was taken back in August 2014. The goat and his herd were climbing about the old remnants of a restaurant that used to be at the top of the mountain. Burned down in a fire in 1979, what is left of the Crest House provides a nice playground for the Mountain Goats and tourists.

Mountain Goats are actually considered an invasive species here in Colorado as they are not native to the Centennial State having been brought here in the early 20th century as a tourist attraction. Unfortunately, they can carry diseases which are deadly to our state’s official animal, the Big Horn Sheep. When the goats roam into sheep territory, they are often killed to prevent them from infecting the sheep.

A Mountain Goat takes in the golden light of sunrise on top Mount Evans in Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Mountain Goat takes in the golden light of sunrise on top Mount Evans in Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Mountain Goat gets a closeup

Such cool creatures and lots of fun to photograph. Taken back in June at Glacier National Park, this young goat was hanging out on Logan Pass. We spent a good bit of time observing it while it licked the rocks (for minerals) and grazed on some of the grasses and flowers.

Mountain Goats have a native range that stretches from the Rocky Mountains through Canada and into Alaska. Looking at those solid-looking feet you wouldn’t think they should be able to climb as well as they should. However they have cloven hooves that spread out and dewclaws that help them getting a grip.

A Mountain Goat walks along a wall on Logans Pass in Glacier National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Mountain Goat walks along a wall on Logans Pass in Glacier National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

Big eyes focus on the camera

I came across this Mountain Goat billy near the top of Logan Pass in Glacier National Park, Montana this past summer. He was working his way along, licking rocks to get the minerals from them. As he did, I happily snapped a number of pictures when he finally seemed to notice me and stared right at the camera. After ascertaining I was no threat, he happily went back to ignoring me.

Mountain Goats have a native range stretching from southern Alaska to the Rocky Mountains. The populations here in Colorado where I live are actually non-native, having been brought here in the middle of the 20th century as a tourist attraction.

A Mountain Goat stays focused on the camera. Taken on Logan Pass in Glacier National Park, Montana. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Mountain Goat stays focused on the camera. Taken on Logan Pass in Glacier National Park, Montana. (© Tony’s Takes)

Flowers make a Mountain Goat smile

Who doesn’t like flowers? Almost everyone does including, it appears, this smiling Mountain Goat billy. 😉

I snapped this image early one morning near the top of the 14,265 foot high Mount Evans back in July. This fella was alone enjoying a quite but very chilly morning at high altitude. The blooming flowers of the alpine tundra were beautiful.

Mountain Goats have a native range stretching from southern Alaska to the Rocky Mountains. The populations here in Colorado where I live are actually non-native, having been brought here in the middle of the 20th century as a tourist attraction.

A Mountain Goat billy stands among wildflowers and boulders above timberline in Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Mountain Goat billy stands among wildflowers and boulders above timberline in Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Out for a stroll on the snow with Mom

A capture from my trip to Glacier National Park back in June. There was still a good bit of snow on the ground in shady areas of Logan Pass when these two Mountain Goats came strolling through in the evening. They worked their way to an open patch of ground and quickly commenced eating voraciously.

This particular female is one that has been outfitted with a collar by state and federal biologists. Using GPS or VHF radio, the collars allow scientists to track the animal and better understand its movements and how they are affected by human presence in the busy national park.

A Mountain Goat nanny and her kid walk across the snow on Logan Pass in Glacier National Park.  (© Tony’s Takes)

A Mountain Goat nanny and her kid walk across the snow on Logan Pass in Glacier National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

Mountain Goat kid stops to smell the flowers

Such a cute little thing! A late evening drive up Logan Pass in Glacier National Park, Montana back in June had us meet this little one and its mom. It was quite a voracious eater keeping its nose down and mouth chomping. For one brief instant it stopped and seemed to smell the little wildflower – then it ate it. 😉

A Mountain Goat kid smells a small flower in Glacier National Park, Montana.  (© Tony’s Takes)

A Mountain Goat kid smells a small flower in Glacier National Park, Montana. (© Tony’s Takes)

Mama Mountain Goat shows what she thinks about having her picture taken

This nanny didn’t seem to appreciate having her grazing interrupted by the guy with the camera. 😉  She and her kid were enjoying the lush flora at the top of Logan Pass in Glacier National Park back in June.

This particular female is one that has been outfitted with a collar by state and federal biologists. Using GPS or VHF radio, the collars allow scientists to track the animal and better understand its movements and how they are affected by human presence in the busy national park. You can read more about the program here.

A Mountain Goat nanny sticks her tongue out at the camera. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Mountain Goat nanny sticks her tongue out at the camera. (© Tony’s Takes)

The lopsided Mountain Goat

I can’t say I had ever seen a Mountain Goat without symmetrical horns until I found this one. While near the top of Logan Pass in Glacier National Park, we spotted this one down below the road a good ways.

Light was fleeting as it was late evening and the sun was behind the mountains but the image didn’t come out too bad. Clearly the creature did not care for me taking its picture judging by the tongue it was sticking out at me. 😉

A Mountain Goat in Glacier National Park sticks its tongue out at the photographer. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Mountain Goat in Glacier National Park sticks its tongue out at the photographer. (© Tony’s Takes)

A very cute kid

If this little one doesn’t just melt your heart then you are a much harder person than I. 😉

My own kids wanted a break from all the sightseeing so my wife and I headed out for an evening wildlife viewing on our own on this evening (June 30). From St. Mary, Montana we headed west up to the top of Logan Pass in Glacier National Park.

Just over the summit we came across a beautiful Mountain Goat nanny and its kid. Ignoring the photographers, the pair walked along, grazing and enjoying a quiet evening in the alpine forest.

The kid never strayed far from mom but couldn’t help but be a bit distracted by all the attention it was receiving, stopping every now and then to look at the people. This little one was only a little over a month or so old and it will continue to hang around with its mother for the next year or so.

Mountain Goats have a native range stretching from southern Alaska to the Rocky Mountains. The populations here in Colorado where I live are actually non-native, having been brought here in the middle of the 20th century as a tourist attraction.

A Mountain Goat kid grazes on grass near the summit of Logan Pass in Glacier National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Mountain Goat kid grazes on grass near the summit of Logan Pass in Glacier National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

Just chillin’ out

In the evening at Glacier National Park it was almost a certainty that we would find at least one of these cool creatures hanging out on Logan Pass. On this, what was our first day in our park, this one was content to lay on the snow and stay cool.

A Mountain Goat hangs out on the snow at the top of Logan Pass in Glacier National Park, Montana. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Mountain Goat hangs out on the snow at the top of Logan Pass in Glacier National Park, Montana. (© Tony’s Takes)