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American Kestrel

Kestrel stare down

This female American Kestrel was quite patient but also quite on alert as I snapped pictures of her northeast of Denver, Colorado yesterday. These little falcons are normally quite skittish so it was nice to be able to find one that let me get some closeups.

A female American Kestrel looks down from her perch on a wire. (© Tony’s Takes)

A female American Kestrel looks down from her perch on a wire. (© Tony’s Takes)

Are you looking at my butt?

“Are you looking at my butt?” Well, I guess I was but only because this little guy wouldn’t give me a better view. 😉 Male American Kestrel in Adams County, Colorado yesterday.

A male American Kestrel as seen from behind.  (© Tony’s Takes)

A male American Kestrel as seen from behind. (© Tony’s Takes)

Little falcon keeps watch from light pole

I came across this female American Kestrel a couple of weeks ago in a Denver area suburb.  She was hanging out on a light over a busy street keep watch on a nearby field and golf course.

Kestrel’s are North America’s smallest falcon averaging only 8″ long.  Both the male and the female have the distinctive striping across their faces.  The female though lacks the colorful blue-gray plumage on the wings that the male has. You can learn more about this cool little raptor here.

A female American Kestrel on a light pole in Broomfield, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A female American Kestrel on a light pole in Broomfield, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Kestrel flips photographer the bird

This American Kestrel may not have appreciated having his picture taken this morning as he appeared to be giving me the one finger salute.  😉  After a frustrating morning covering lots of miles with little to show for it, I was happy to find this little guy on the last leg home.

An American Kestrel scratches its face in Adams County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

An American Kestrel scratches its face in Adams County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Bevy of Birds (and a Bison) with New Tamron Lens

Finally some sun – and time – allowing me to get out and give the new Tamron SP 150-600 a good field test.  Early to mid-afternoon time period not ideal in terms of lighting but the lens handled it well.  All images hand-held.

Kestrel on a wire

I saw this little guy yesterday in an area known for hawks but it was cold, windy and snowy so I knew anything I captured would be less than stellar. Today I went back by and there he was, perched on a wire enjoying the (somewhat) milder temperatures and the warming morning sun. American Kestrels are North America’s smallest falcon but as fierce as any raptor.

An American Kestrel sits perched on a wire near Denver International Airport.  (© Tony’s Takes)

An American Kestrel sits perched on a wire near Denver International Airport. (© Tony’s Takes)

 

American Kestrel holds on in strong winds

North America’s smallest falcon – the American Kestrel. Haven’t had much time to take pictures the last couple of weeks so today I forced myself to make time. Took a walk along the South Platte River in Adams County, Colorado and managed to see this little guy hanging on in some stiff wind. Gray skies made for a poor background but I was pleased to get some pics as I have not had much luck getting pictures of them before.

North America's smallest falcon - the American Kestrel. (© Tony’s Takes)

North America’s smallest falcon – the American Kestrel. (© Tony’s Takes)

Mouse – It’s what’s for dinner

Hawks have become quite plentiful along the Colorado Front Range this spring as they return from their winter grounds.  Today was a veritable hawk fast out near Denver International Airport.

Among the many images captured today was this Red Tailed Hawk with its kill.  It was initially perched on the pole, then swooped down to a nearby field and emerged with its meal. Unfortunately he didn’t want me to watch him eat and soon flew off before I could see it eat.

A Red Tailed Hawk stands on a pole with its catch. (© Tony’s Takes)

A Red Tailed Hawk stands on a pole with its catch. (© Tony’s Takes)