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Osprey

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Osprey focused on flight – and the photographer

Kind of a fun, panoramic crop on this cool raptor allowing you to see it up close and personal and check out that big wingspan. This bright-eyed, handsome fellow caught me a bit off guard with its launch and I was zoomed in farther than what I normally would be for a flight shot. It turned out pretty well though I think. Most of the Osprey parents are now sitting on eggs and it shouldn’t be too much longer before little ones make their appearance.

Panoramic crop of a male Osprey as it takes flight in Weld County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Panoramic crop of a male Osprey as it takes flight in Weld County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Osprey gives its thoughts about Monday

Osprey gives its thoughts about Monday. I could not agree more. 😀 Couldn’t resist after what was a rough start to the workweek. It’s all downhill from here right?

An Osprey empties its bowels in Adams County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

An Osprey empties its bowels in Adams County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Just a little bit too much zoom on an Osprey flyover

Not sure who was more surprised – this intruding male Osprey or me! I was observing a mated pair of Osprey at their nest in Weld County, Colorado when they suddenly became very agitated.

That is a sure sign of an intruder of some kind and sure enough, I spotted another male Osprey flying around. He clearly had thoughts of booting the husband from the home, making many low, fast passes over the mated pair.

On one, I had my face stuck in my camera as he approached and with that limited perspective it is sometimes hard to gauge just how close something is. Well, clearly pretty darned close in this case! 😀

The intruder flew not 10 feet over my head as he made another harassing pass at the nest, staring right at me as he did so. He was pretty backlit and I cut off the ends of the ends of the wings but it makes for a fun capture I think.

Closeup of a male Osprey as it flies overhead. (© Tony’s Takes)

Closeup of a male Osprey as it flies overhead. (© Tony’s Takes)

Osprey preps for landing

These raptors are busily setting up their homes, getting ready to lay eggs and have little ones. This particular nest, as you can tell, is on top of a power pole. Not exactly an ideal type location but one which Osprey are infamous for utilizing. This unfortunately does sometimes result in bad outcomes for obvious reasons – hopefully that will not be the case with this one.

A male Osprey returns to its nest in Adams County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A male Osprey returns to its nest in Adams County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

First Osprey of the year signals the arrival of spring

I figured I would be seeing these cool raptors any day now as they return from their winter homes along the Gulf Coast and South America. Sunday proved to be the day when I spotted the first of the season, six in fact at various spots in northern Colorado.

This particular guy was hanging out at St Vrain State Park, Colorado and put on a nice little show for me. After a quick patrol of one of the ponds, he returned and gave me a fantastic landing sequence, including this capture of him as he settled in on his perch.

Osprey are actually a type of hawk. They are spring and summer residents of the Centennial State and other spots in the United States. Some Osprey will take on extraordinarily long migrations. One GPS-tracked bird flew 2,700 miles from Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, to French Guiana, South America in 2008.

A male Osprey makes a picture perfect landing at St Vrain State Park in Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A male Osprey makes a picture perfect landing at St Vrain State Park in Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Focus!

Holy moly, look at that stare! I’ve photographed many Osprey in the wild and the looks they give are pretty darned intense. Brizo is a captive raptor, injured at a young age and unable to fly. She is now under the care of Nature’s Educators. This was a nice opportunity to get up close and personal with one and she was gorgeous. Taken in Sedalia, Colorado.

An Osprey gives a very intense stare. (© Tony’s Takes)

An Osprey gives a very intense stare. (© Tony’s Takes)

Osprey on the hunt

I happened across this pretty lady back in August in Grand County, Colorado. Her young ones had fledged so her and her mate were free to do as they pleased. On this morning, she was patrolling the waters of a nearby lake looking for breakfast.

These summer-season visitors to Colorado are some of my favorite raptors. They are gone from my area and have headed south to the Gulf Coast and South America for the winter.

Some Osprey will take on extraordinarily long migrations. One GPS-tracked bird flew 2,700 miles from Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, to French Guiana, South America in 2008.

A female Osprey patrols the waters of a mountain lake in Grand County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

A female Osprey patrols the waters of a mountain lake in Grand County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Male Osprey nails its landing

This the time of year when many of Colorado’s summertime residents start their journey south to warmer environs and the Osprey is one of those. Most have already left, a wise move given the taste of fall we have seen the last couple of days, as colder temperatures and wet conditions arrived.

These raptors have a very long migration as most will spend their summers along the coasts of Mexico and South America. In 2008, one Osprey was tracked making a 2,700 mile journey in 13 days from Massachusetts to French Guiana!

I spent quite a bit of time with a few different pair or these during the spring and summer and will be anxiously awaiting their return next year.

An Osprey comes in for a landing in Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

An Osprey comes in for a landing in Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Osprey struggles to stay focused

Do you worry about the photographer or pay attention to the landing you are about to make? This beautiful female Osprey struggled with the decision.

She was originally perched by her nest but decided to relocate at which time she spotted me. This seemed to make her a bit disconcerted and she made a bit of a ruckus then made a landing at the top of a young, spindly pine tree.

That landing though proved to be a bit difficult because rather than making sure she had sure footing, she kept her eye on me. It took a few attempts to get a good grip on the tree before she was finally able to settle in on the new perch.

Taken in Grand Lake, Colorado.

A female Osprey struggles to land at the top of a pine tree in Grand County, Colorado.  (© Tony’s Takes)

A female Osprey struggles to land at the top of a pine tree in Grand County, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Bad attitude Osprey

The male at this particular nest not too far from my house didn’t really seem to want his picture taken on this morning. This was taken a few weeks ago and I haven’t been back since but do need to get by there as I believe he and his mate now have a few new mouths to feed.

Osprey are actually a type of hawk. They are spring and summer residents of the Centennial State and spend their winters in the warmer environs of the coasts of Mexico and South America.

A male Osprey seems less than thrilled about having its picture taken. (© Tony’s Takes)

A male Osprey seems less than thrilled about having its picture taken. (© Tony’s Takes)

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