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Elk

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Bugling big boy

The annual Elk rut is over and they have settled down and are preparing for a long, cold winter. This image was taken back in the middle of September at the height of the mating season.

While this bull looked and sounded quite impressive as he patrolled the hills, the ladies either weren’t very taken with him or he was not as good of a fighter as you might guess from his looks. There was only one cow in the area and she was doing her best to avoid him. I guess looks aren’t everything. 😉

An Elk bull bugles hoping to attract the females. (© Tony’s Takes)

An Elk bull bugles hoping to attract the females. (© Tony’s Takes)

Closeup of Elk bull keeping watch on his harem

Closeup of Elk bull keeping watch on his harem. Taken a couple of weeks ago, this big fella had his harem of 10 near Mary’s Lake in Estes Park, away from any real competition. That allowed him to enjoy a quiet evening by the lake with the ladies, something we all would enjoy. 😉

In front of the eye you may notice the ‘preorbital gland’. Elk, deer and a lot of other hoofed animals have them. These scent glands secrete pheromones and other chemicals. They then will rub their faces on bushes and tree branches, commonly believed as a way of marking their territory.

More of my pics of these cool creatures can be found here.

Closeup of an Elk bull in Estes Park, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Closeup of an Elk bull in Estes Park, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Elk calf enjoys a grassy dinner

We spent the weekend in Estes Park, Colorado, touring Rocky Mountain National Park each day. Photo opportunities were a bit rare for me but yesterday evening this one came along not a quarter mile from our campsite. A bull had himself a nice little harem and this young one was hanging out with its mom.

My wife and I spent a good while sitting in the rain just enjoying the scene. You can definitely tell the weather is changing with the seasons as there was a notable chill in the air and snow on many of the peaks, particularly above timberline.

An Elk calf grazes on some grass near Mary's Lake in Estes Park, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

An Elk calf grazes on some grass near Mary’s Lake in Estes Park, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Bull Elk chases after the ladies for Wapiti Wednesday

With hormones raging, the Elk rut is in full swing and the males are doing their best to gather up their harems. This particular guy, while a good-sized specimen for sure, was not having much luck.

He was relegated to an area far away from the main herds and was chasing a single cow. Despite his best strutting and bugling, she showed little interest and spurned the overtures.

We sometimes call these creatures Wapiti, a word that comes from the Shawnee and Cree word ‘waapiti’ which means ‘white rump.’ They are one of the largest members of the deer family in North America, second only to Moose.

A massive Elk bull keeps watch for the ladies in Rocky Mountain National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

A massive Elk bull keeps watch for the ladies in Rocky Mountain National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

Bull Elk engage in pre-rut posturing

One for Wapiti Wednesday that was taken this past Saturday in Rocky Mountain National Park.

The rut is still a few weeks away but you can get a sense that it is getting closer if you watch the behavior of the Elk bulls. This pair and a couple more were hanging out and seemingly getting along (for now) but they did engage in a small hint of what is to come.

The larger one on the right raised his head and closed in on the slightly smaller one, posing a bit of a challenge to it. It never went any further than that but you know the time is coming where these two will do battle for the affections of the ladies.

Two large Elk bulls engage in some pre-rut posturing in Rocky Mountain National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

Two large Elk bulls engage in some pre-rut posturing in Rocky Mountain National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

Bull Elk poses for Wapiti Wednesday

It’s been a while since I have posted any pics of these guys and even longer since I took a picture of one. This past weekend’s trip though gave me the opportunity to see a lot of them. The herds are all quiet now, enjoying the cool, spring weather. The males are sporting their growing, velvet-covered antlers while the females tend to the calves that were just born. Soon, may will be heading for higher altitudes to escape the heat and bugs. The name Wapiti comes from Native Americans meaning ‘light colored deer.’

An Elk bull poses for pictures in Rocky Mountain National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

An Elk bull poses for pictures in Rocky Mountain National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

Elk bull calls out his challenger

One for Wapiiti Wednesday! Taken back in September at the height of the annual Elk rut. This was the start of one of the most amazing 15 minutes I have ever spent with these creatures. Two bulls, each with their own harem, were at opposite ends of a meadow.

Their close proximity to each other had them uneasy and one simply could not resist challenging the other. Bugling from opposite sides, the combatants slowly worked their way toward a meeting in the middle. Here, one of the two, sounds a warning that he was ready for battle – and indeed he was. They would soon engage in an epic clash unlike any I had ever witnessed. You can see the entire sequence here.

A massive Elk bull bugles to a challenger on the other side of a meadow in Rocky Mountain National Park.  (© Tony’s Takes)

A massive Elk bull bugles to a challenger on the other side of a meadow in Rocky Mountain National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

Dad stops by to say hi

Taking a break from guarding his harem, this massive bull Elk stopped by to check on the most recent generation of the herd. It was a very cute, tender moment as he and the two calves enjoyed a moment of peace from the rut, a dramatic and tension-filled time of year.

We sometimes call these creatures Wapiti, a word that comes from the Shawnee and Cree word ‘waapiti’ which means ‘white rump.’ There are one of the largest members of the deer family in North America, second only to Moose.

Taken on September 16, 2016 in the Moraine Park area of Rocky Mountain National Park.

A bull Elk checks on the calves in his harem in Rocky Mountain National Park.  (© Tony’s Takes)

A bull Elk checks on the calves in his harem in Rocky Mountain National Park. (© Tony’s Takes)

Massive Elk bull knocks his rival back, off his feet for Wapiti Wednesday

One of a sequence of images that I still have to pinch myself to believe I captured. While the rest of my crew opted to sleep in, I headed out for a hike on a crisp, high country September morning, lugging my camera along as always. I didn’t have to go far before an action-packed scene began to unfold.

In a nearby meadow, two bulls had gathered their harems, one at each end. Not content with simply keeping the females they had, the bulls opted to challenge each other for control of the groups. An epic battle ensued as the two immense creatures put their heads down, locked antlers and clashed. Here, the larger of the two, pushes back his smaller rival, lifting the smaller one off its back feet as it drove its head toward the ground.

It was an amazing experience, one of my favorite wildlife encounters of all time. You can check out the entire sequence of images from the battle here.

Two bull Elks grapple in front of their harems in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado.  (© Tony’s Takes)

Two bull Elks grapple in front of their harems in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. (© Tony’s Takes)

Elk bull sounds off for one of his ladies

From one of my favorite wildlife events – the annual Elk rut in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. With the changing of the seasons, fall also brings on mating season for these high country residents. For weeks the males work themselves into a frenzy, gathering up all the females they can into harems and then fighting to control their ladies and earn the right to mate with them. With hormones raging, the bulls bugle to call the females and to ward off any potential challengers.

On this morning back in September, this bull had gathered a harem of about 15 cows. A second bull in the area though was threatening and this first bull was doing his best to ensure he left them alone.

A massive bull Elk bugles toward one of the members of his harem. (© Tony’s Takes)

A massive bull Elk bugles toward one of the members of his harem. (© Tony’s Takes)

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